Category: Open data

Benefacts Nonprofit Sector Analysis 2017. (LtoR) Adrienne Regan (Davy), Neil Pope (Millington Pope) and Faye Drouillard (The Giving Circle(s) of Amsterdam & Ireland) pictured at the launch of the inaugural annual Benefacts Nonprofit Sector Analysis 2017 in the Royal Irish Academy on Friday, 28th April. This benchmark report by Benefacts is the most comprehensive analysis ever undertaken of nonprofit organisations in Ireland, including registered charities. View the report at www.Benefacts.ie/analysis.

Faye Drouillard believes Benefacts Nonprofit Sector Analysis 2017 is a ‘public good’

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“This kind of data is a public good”

Faye Drouillard, Founder – The Giving Circle(s) of Amsterdam & Ireland, deemed the publication of the sector analysis report to be a positive step for the sector, and a very timely one.  She considers this information to be a public good; something that everyone has a right to know.

 

Read the Benefacts Nonprofit Sector Analysis 2017 here

Benefacts nonprofit sector annual analysis 2017. (LtoR) Caitriona Fottrell (The Ireland Funds), Kevin Daly (Dept of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation) and Mary Sutton (Atlantic Philanthropies) pictured at the launch of the inaugural annual Benefacts nonprofit sector analysis 2017 in the Royal Irish Academy on Friday, 28th April. This benchmark report by Benefacts is the most comprehensive analysis ever undertaken of nonprofit organisations in Ireland, including registered charities. View the report at www.Benefacts.ie/analysis.

Benefacts Nonprofit Sector Analysis 2017: a perspective from Caitriona Fottrell

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“Really ground-breaking”

Caitriona Fottrell is Vice President and Director (Ireland) of The Ireland Funds, one of Benefacts’ funders and long-time supporters.  She felt that the report revealed important information and would prove ground-breaking for the sector. 

 

Read Benefacts Nonprofit Sector Analysis 2017

Benefacts releases the most comprehensive ever analysis of Irish nonprofits

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A major new report on Irish nonprofits was launched today by Mr Paschal Donohoe TD, Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform. Using public data derived from more than 8,000 nonprofit company reports for 2013, 2014 and 2015 in Ireland, Benefacts has identified some key trends in the sector which today employs almost 150,000 people, turns over nearly €11bn annually and accounts for 8% of all current Exchequer expenditure.

Also speaking at the event was the European Ombudsman, Emily O’Reilly and Patricia Quinn, Benefacts MD.

Among the key findings of the report:

* 310 charities and other nonprofits delivering public services as quasi-public bodies receive more than 70% of the €5.3bn which the Government commits in funding annually to the sector (these are the higher education bodies, voluntary hospitals and local service providers and are listed on benefacts.ie/news)

* In this sector, just over 1% of people receive more than €70,000 in annual remuneration compared to 12.8% in the workforce at large, and most of the higher-paid people are working in quasi-public bodies where their salaries are linked to public sector pay scales

* Disclosure standards in 2015 have fallen, with 23% of all charities opting to file abridged financial statements, which provide no information about the sources of their income

Speaking at the launch, Mr Paschal Donohoe TD, Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform said:

“It gives me great pleasure to have been invited here today to officially launch the Benefacts Analysis of Irish nonprofits 2017. The sector turns over nearly €11bn annually, half of which comes from State funding, with the sector employing close to 150,000 people. The work undertaken by Benefacts significantly enhances the effectiveness of Government’s – and wider society’s – interaction with the nonprofit sector. This delivers major benefits to us all in terms of transparency, governance, regulation and, importantly, policy making.”

Benefacts founder and MD Patricia Quinn commented:

“When you consider that nonprofits constitute at least 10% of all of the organisations in Ireland, it’s remarkable that it has taken so long to give them the recognition they deserve. Thanks to new charity regulation, new company reporting standards and consistent government commitment to Open Data principles, we are now able to bring some transparency to a sector that has languished in the shade for too long. We have committed to making this an annual report, disclosing key trends and helping to restore trust in Ireland’s civil society organisations.”

Explore Benefacts Analysis now

Almost 20,000 Nonprofits in our New Website Release!

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We have just added 704 additional nonprofits to the Benefacts Database of Irish Nonprofits, which increases the number of Irish nonprofits you can find here from 18,586 up to 19,290.

Now included in the database are:

Our thanks to the Registrar of Friendly Societies and the Librarian of the Houses of the Oireachtas for their help in getting a lot of this data online for the first time!

Benefacts Open Datasets

As well as adding new organisations to the scope of the database, we’ve released an open dataset about all of the nonprofits in the Benefacts Database of Irish Nonprofits. We’ll be keeping this live which means it will get updated every day as we feed fresh data that we in turn acquire from 8 public sources.

The data is provided in “open” formats – this means that it can be universally and readily accessed and downloaded, and is also machine-readable. Benefacts Open Datasets can now be downloaded here, and we also publish daily updated files to the Government’s Open Data portal.

Benefacts.ie is now 6 months live

Since going live in May 2016, more than 25,000 unique visitors have accessed our site for data about Irish nonprofits.  We’re marking the anniversary with some design and content updates to the website.

Tell us what you think

We’ve updated the homepage to make it more user-friendly and we have further developments to the website planned in coming months – watch this space!

We are always interested in your thoughts about our website please tell us what you think of what you’ve seen so far and also stay tuned as we are rolling out a user survey next week.

For regular updates from, make sure to follow us on Twitter, join the discussions on LinkedIn and subscribe to our e-newsletters.

 

 

 

 

Sports organisations in the Benefacts Database of Irish Nonprofits

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Besides the Olympic Council of Ireland (OCI), there are more than 3,000 sports organisations listed today in the Benefacts Database of Irish Nonprofits. All enjoy the benefit of tax relief from Revenue, but only a handful are registered as charities by the Charities Regulator – this is because Section 2 the Charities Act 2009 specifically excludes sport from the definition of a charity in Irish law.

The OCI makes public disclosures as a company limited by guarantee, and these documents are re-published and analysed on their Benefacts listing. This indicates that the company was incorporated 34 years ago, in 1981, and reported having four paid employees in 2014. In addition, the company’s audited financial statements for that year report the payment of a €60,000 “Honorarium” to the Chairman of the Board (called the President in the company’s constitution), Patrick Joseph Hickey.

Besides the OCI’s President, who took office in 1982, six Directors have served for more than nine years including one who has served for 23 years, and three who have each served for 19 years on the Board, which is called the Executive Committee in the company’s constitution – download it here.

The Benefacts listing for OCI indicates that the company’s income in 2014 – of which 32% came from the Irish Sports Council – grew by 62% over the previous year, and its expenses by 25%. Net assets at €2m remained almost the same.

Besides paying for its own staff and overhead costs, the OCI distributed grants totalling €206,400 to “Olympic Solidarity Courses/Team Support” and to 12 affiliated sporting organisations – all listed in the Benefacts database of Irish Nonprofits: Rowing Ireland, Gymnastics Ireland, Swim Ireland, Snowsports Association of Ireland, Weightlifting Ireland, Basketball Ireland, National Target Shooting Association, Irish Ice Hockey Association, Irish Fencing Federation, Irish Amateur Boxing Association, Cycling Ireland, and Archery Ireland.